Yemen port and airport 'opened for vital aid delivery'

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Global aid groups have welcomed the decision to let aid in, but said aid flights are not enough to avert a humanitarian crisis.

However, the coalition's blockade has remained on Yemen's seaport of Hodeidah, which has cut off food, medicine and fuel imports to the Yemeni northern population where more than 7 million people are on the brink of starvation.

The coalition fighting the armed Houthi movement in Yemen said on Wednesday it would allow aid in through the Red Sea ports of Hodeidah and Salif, as well as United Nations flights to Sanaa, but there has been no confirmation of any aid deliveries yet.

The International Committee of the Red Cross landed a passenger flight at Sanaa on Wednesday, spokesman Ewan Watson told AFP.

The UN humanitarian affairs office said on Friday it was given clearance by a coalition led by Saudi Arabia to resume flights into Sanaa.

McGoldrick said that a flight carrying vaccines, sufficient to begin vaccinations of about one million children, is expected to land in Sanaa over the weekend.

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The White House made a statement that it looks forward to additional steps that will facilitate the flow of humanitarian and commercial goods from all ports of entry.

United Nations officials cautiously welcomed the decision and said they also expect the port of Salef also reopen.

The UN had recently announced that it received permission from the Saudi-led coalition to back legitimacy in Yemen to transfer aid by air to Yemen from the Jordanian capital Amman to Sana'a. Iran has denied supplying weapons.

The United States called on the worldwide community to take the necessary steps to "hold the Iranian regime accountable for its repeated violations of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 2216 (adopted in 2015) and UN resolution 2231 as the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps exploits the grave humanitarian crisis in Yemen to advance its regional ambitions".

Since March 2015, Saudi Arabia and some of its Arab allies have been carrying out deadly airstrikes against the Houthi Ansarullah movement in an attempt to restore power to fugitive former President Abd Rabbuh Mansour Hadi, a close ally of Riyadh.

In an interview just before the coalition made the announcement, McGoldrick told The Associated Press that a continued blockade would make Yemen's long-suffering population more vulnerable to cholera and starvation.

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