N.Korea Suspected in Global Ransomware Attack

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Cyber security researchers around the world have said they have found evidence that could link North Korea with the WannaCry cyber attack.

Computer codes are often shared among different groups, so the matching code isn't definitive proof Lazarus was behind the cyberattack.

A security researcher for Google appears to be the first to have noticed the link.

More cyberattacks could be in the pipeline after the global havoc caused by the Wannacry ransomware, a South Korean cybersecurity expert warned today as fingers pointed at the North.

WannaCry, developed in part with hacking techniques that were either stolen or leaked from the U.S. National Security Agency, has infected more than 300,000 computers since Friday, locking up their data and demanding a ransom payment to release it. According to Mehta's discovery, the "Lazarus Group" that works on behalf of North Koreans may be behind the attack as the hacking group has, in the past, used the same coding and tools as were used in "WannaCrypt" - the software used in the current hacking into the Microsoft operating software, the BBC reported on Tuesday. The United States accused it of being behind a cyber attack on Sony Pictures in 2014.

Choi said that if North Korea's culpability is proven, the world should start taking their capabilities seriously and ensure consequences for such actions.

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There is another possibility that "Lazarus Group" may be working independently and without the instructions from North Korea, the report added.

Vietnam's state media said on Tuesday more than 200 computers had been affected, but one of the country's leading anti virus companies, Bkav, later put the figure at 1,900.

North Korea has denied being behind the Sony and banking attacks.

Experts said that has left millions of Chinese computers without security support and made China among countries most affected by the WannaCry "ransomware" attack, which has hit more than 150 countries.

Taiwan Power Co. TAIWP.UL said that almost 800 of its computers were affected, although these were used for administration, not for systems involved in electricity generation.

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